Student & Parent Info

Interscholastic Athletics Brochure

New Attendance Area FAQ

 
Weekly Sport Parent Tip from Responsible Sports:
 
“Divided loyalties hinder people. Sharing your disapproval of a coach with your children puts them in a bind. Conversely, when parents support a coach, it is easier for children to put forth maximum effort. If you think your child’s coach is mishandling a situation, do not tell your child. Ask for a meeting with the coach or athletic director.”
 
“If you find yourself repeatedly feeling like you have to let the official know he’s made a bad call, sign up to officiate next season.”
 
“Consider what you look like on the sideline during the game. Kids sneak looks at their parents more than we realize, and body language speaks volumes.”
 
Youth athletes have a special ear for their parents’ voices. Realize this during games, and make sure what they hear from you is not conflicting with coaches’ instructions and intentions.”
 
“To excel, your children must love the game enough to work at it. Pressuring them to excel can sap that love. You can nurture this love of playing by noticing and recognizing them for specific things they’re doing well.”
 
“Encourage your children to occasionally take risks on the athletic field. Without this, they might always be afraid to make mistakes and won’t maximize their athletic ability”
 
 
“When your child is really nervous before a game, ask her if she wants to go to the field where the game will be played and check it out ahead of time. This will give your child a sense of control and take some unknowns off the table”
 
“Help your young athlete to understand the value of a good opponent. Good opponents bring out the best in us. Model this attitude by talking about opponents respectfully. Never demonize the opponent as “the enemy.”
 
” Talk with your child about his goals and how sports may help him achieve them. Recognize that your goals for his sports experience may not be the same as his. Support him in striving to reach his goals. If the goals are all about skills or results, remind your child that “having fun” should be at the top of the list.”
 
“If your child’s coach does not call a parent meeting before the season starts, ask for one. You could even offer to organize one for them”
 
“Ask your children’s coaches if they have a coaching philosophy. If not, let them know you admire coaches who strive to succeed, while teaching life lessons through sports.”

“When your child’s Responsible Coach redefines “winner” through a mastery approach to coaching, reinforce the coach’s approach. Instead of focusing on the scoreboard, remember the ELM Tree of Mastery for Effort, Learning and Mistakes are OK (because mistakes help us learn, but fear of mistakes helps us fail).”

 

“Coaching your own child can offer some of life’s greatest moments, though it requires a delicate balance between coaching and parenting. Make it clear to your child when you are in coach “mode”. Be sensitive to favoring or penalizing your child.”

“To excel, your children must love the game enough to work at it. Pressuring them to excel can sap that love. You can nurture this love of playing by noticing and recognizing them for specific things they’re doing well.”

 

 
“Avoid having your children specialize in one sport too early. It can lead to burnout and overuse injuries, and perhaps, worst of all, falling out of love with the sport.”
 
 
 
“As soon as you know who your child’s coach is going to be, introduce yourself, let him or her know you want to help your child have the best experience and offer to assist the coach in any way you are able. Meeting the coach early and establishing a positive relationship will make conversation easier if a problem arises during the season.”

Parent Coach Communication Guide

 

Interscholastic Athletics Brochure 

 

More information and all important documents coming soon!